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The Connection Between Depression, Mental Health, and the Olympics: Helping to Forge a New Perspective as You Watch the Olympics

The Connection Between Depression, Mental Health, and the Olympics: Helping to Forge a New Perspective as You Watch the Olympics

Four Thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety…4990. This is the approximate hours many olympic hopefuls put in have an opportunity to compete in olympics. And mind you, some do not make it.

An article from the Huffington Post details how depression can take hold of many athletes, even those that did perform at high levels enough to experience the olympic glory and win a medal.   It is worth a read to gain an additional perspective about what these athletes go through and to remind us the importance of keeping a check on our mental state.

The article describes it well helping to provide a window to the perspective of the olympic aspiring athlete.

It’s almost like they’re on a treadmill and they’re sprinting as hard as they can go and someone pulls the emergency cord. Boom, everything stops, and they get thrown back, they’re out of sorts. They were running so fast, and they got used to being so fast.

As we are watching people like Michael Phelps, Katie Ledecky, Usain Bolt, and other popular olympians win, it’s important to recognize and think about the many psychological states that the athletes have experienced, are experiencing, and will experience.  It is also equally important to think of the other olympians that did not obtain olympic glory or those that did not even qualify despite their athletic talents and what they endure psychologically.

I leave you with another quote from the article that may encourage us as viewers to think about these olympians.

We as spectators have a responsibility to view them that way, too: seeing beyond the times, the numbers, and the wingspans, and looking instead at the racing hearts propelling their sculpted bodies forward.

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